Buyer’s Guide: Eberlestock Halftrack Pack Review

Campfire in the woods

by The Angry Prepper

Eberlestock’s Halftrack is a great bag (check the current price and availability at Amazon.com).  This bag is made of tough stuff  & is very dependable.  The Halftrack is a 50 Liter bag that weighs about 6lbs. & 12oz.  For starters, this bag has every feature I have ever looked for in a bag.  The first thing I noticed is the excessive amount MOLLE webbing on the outside of the bag.  There is a nice size compartment at the top of the bag.  Good for holding smaller items.  There is also MOLLE webbing on the top of that compartment.

There are compression straps on both sides of the bag.  There are two large side-mounted compartments on both sides of the bag.  They can be used to hold two 3-liter hydration systems or extra gear.  There are 2 smaller pockets called Catch-All pockets on both sides of the bag, located at the bottom with drawstring assist.  There are also 2 tunnel pockets behind the side-mounted compartment.  The tunnel pockets can be used to carry skis, long poles, Shotguns & other long equipment.

There is a flat pocket on the front of the bag.  You can put a book or two or hold paperwork.  The shoulder harness & straps are great. They are comfortable as they cinch & un-cinch with ease.  The shoulder harness is adjustable as well.  Providing you with better support to carrying your load.  Now, the waist belt is one of the many features into why I bought the bag.  It fits around my waist & it doesn’t cut into me.  The waist belt is very comfortable & stays on my hips.  There is MOLLE webbing on both sides of the waist belt as well.

Halftrack Back

Halftrack Back

The Halftrack is a front loader, which makes getting to your gear easier & avoids a lot of digging around in your bag.  There is MOLLE webbing inside the bag as well.  Another feature that I like is the fold-down shelf that separates the main chamber into an upper & lower chamber.  There is also a mesh flap in the rear of the main compartment.  It serves as a radio rack but for civilians, you can store more gear.

At the bottom of the bag, there is a lightweight pull out rain cover.  That covers the entire bag.  So, there are a total of 5 compartments with the Fold Down Shelf down, 6 compartments if you raise the Fold Down Shelf & 15 pockets throughout the bag.

This bag is tough & very comfortable.  The padding on the back of the bag is very comfortable. The design reduces sweating & allows for some air to the back. I would recommend the bag to anyone looking for a great tactical bag to use.  I do recommend tactical gear for civilian use because most tactical gears are tough as nails.

As A Bug Out Bag:

This is where this bag makes its mark.  As a Bug Out Bag, this bag holds a lot of gear. The bag’s features make storing & retrieving gear easy.  The front-loading feature is great because it reduces your having to dig through the bag to get an item out.  The 6 liters of water you can carry is another huge feature.

The two side-mounted compartments allow you to carry 1.5 gallons of water, which adds an additional 12 lbs. to the bag.  Instead of carrying water, you can also store gear in the side-mounted compartments.  If you pack the bag right, you can store 5 – 7 days worth of gear.  There are 12 smaller pockets on the inside of the bag alone, which allows you to store smaller items.  Smaller items such as extra ammo, 550 cord, emergency blankets, & paperwork.

Durability & Comfort:

To test out its durability & comfort.  I used the bag as an EDC & walked to work.   The walk is 3 miles.  I made sure I had the same amount of weight as my regular Bug Out Bag.  When walking with the bag I noticed that it stays square on the back & doesn’t shift around.

The shoulder harness plays a great role in carrying your Bug Out Gear.  With the harness being adjustable it makes carrying the load easier.  The shoulder straps don’t cut into you, no matter how much weight you put in.  I have thrown the bag around to test its durability.

It holds up well.  The strong stitching throughout the bag also holds together well.  The buckles are sturdy.  The clips are tough after repeated use.  It doesn’t keep rain out well so I suggest using the rain cover that comes with the bag.

MOLLE Webbing:

Using the MOLLE webbing on this bag, you can MOLLE all kinds of gear to it.  You can MOLLE medical pouches (which should put on the side or front of the bag), you can MOLLE water bottle pouches (which should be put on the waist belt for easy access), & you can MOLLE miscellaneous pouches for whatever you need them for.  The MOLLE webbing is stitched in strong & doesn’t tear away so easily.  You can also MOLLE  gear on the inside of the bag to make up more compartments, that will allow you to carry even more gear.

Practice:

The Halftrack is a great bag but you should always practice with whatever Bug Out Bag you own.  A Bug Out Bag is an extension of you.  This bag will save your life, it will feed you, keep you warm, & shelter you. You have to know how your bag will feel on your back after walking a certain distance.  By practicing ahead of time, you will have made all the necessary adjustments that were needed.  Get to know how it handles on your body.

Conclusion:

My opinion is that the Halftrack makes for a great Bug Out Bag.  Yes, there are others that are cheaper & can get the job the done.  But I would rather spend the money & have a dependable bag on my back then have a cheap bag that might disappoint.  The Halftrack is worth the money.  Remember, you get what you pay for & if you pay for this bag you will not be disappointed.

Note: This article was written a while ago when the Halftrack was my main Bug Out Bag.  I later made it my EDC then it became my wife’s Bug Out Bag (She now has her own fitted Bug Out Bag).  The Halftrack is now my work bag with my everyday essential items.  I now own the Eberlestock Skycrane two as my main Bug Out Bag, which I’ll have a review on soon.

M.D. Creekmore

I've been interested in self-reliance topics for over 25 years. I’m the author of four books that you can find here. Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about prepping, homesteading, and self-reliance topics through first-hand experience and now I want to share what I’ve learned with you.